AEW phenom Darby Allin champions the counter culture in the world of professional wrestling

Posted by Ramon Gonzales in Mosh Talks on November 5, 2020

In a world of exaggerated characters and over-the-top-personas, Allin remains a enigmatic figure that resonates with fans and never has to fake it to make it.

Ahead of his showdown with Cody Rhodes for the AEW pay-per-view event Full Gear, Darby Allin sat in for an especially forthcoming conversation on the Knotfest series Mosh Talks.

Assessing his first year with the AEW banner, Allin detailed how the creative freedom to be himself and not have to adhere to a contrived, scripted storyline is a workplace environment that allows him to thrive – both athletically and artistically. Allin would share that the ability to present himself in such an honest, earnest way on a national stage like AEW is a dream come true.

In terms his esthetic, Allin talked about how his signature face paint is very much a DIY effort and how he appreciates that fans feel it’s a look they can embrace just the same. Allin would also share some especially personal insight to the origins of the face paint and how the skeleton on just one side of his face is very much a part of his true identity.

Allin would share that the inspiration for the face paint came from the childhood trauma of surviving a fatal car accident at just five years old. Allin confided that he was in the car with his uncle that decided drive drunk and ultimately died as a result of a tragic car accident. It’s a part of his identity that the wrestler really doesn’t divulge despite the event being such a formative instance in steering his social skepticism.

For the casual fan, the mystique that shrouds Allin in the ring could be chalked up to great character development, but the reality remains that with Allin, what you see if really what you get. That mystique isn’t something constructed or part of any costume. While the star of the promotion thrives in the spotlight, he’s admittedly a bit of a recluse. Given that fact, AEW nurtures that mystique in a way that keeps fans fixed and give Allin the room to simply be who he really is in and out of the ring.

Throughout the conversation, it becomes very clear that while professional wrestling is almost predicated on the persona – this is no act for Darby. His passion for the profession started at a very young age and though he initially didn’t think he would be able to hack it as a 118-pound 18 year old, Allin eventually embraced his inner ‘fuck it’ and threw caution to the wind.

Going into the business he already had the mindset that he had no intention of compromising his identity to make it. He was going to pursue his passion on his own terms and that meant not having to worry about faking anything. The look, the music, the disregard – it’s all real, it’s all Darby.

When it comes to music, Allin also discussed how there are two particular bands that have been especially influential in his life. Citing the work ethic and brass tacks of Black Flag and the individuality of Crass, Allin correlated those traits to his own life and disposition. He values where he came from and refuse to compromise for anyone.

Watch the complete interview with AEW’s Darby Allin on Mosh Talks below.


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